Watch My Films Streaming on Amazon Prime Video

Watch My Films Streaming on Amazon Prime Video
Click to Check Out These Films and More from the American Revolution through WWII.

Archive for July 2016

Hacksaw Ridge Trailer "Please Help Me Get One More."


WWII stories continue to engage worldwide audiences and Mel Gibson's epic forthcoming film, Hacksaw Ridge, in my opinion raises the bar.  The official trailer was unveiled today. You cannot look away.





Thursday
Posted by Robert Child

American History Free on Kindle Today in Honor of July 4th

Today between the BBQ and fireworks you can grab two of my historical books on Kindle absolutely FREE. And you can get another historical book for .99 cents for a limited time. Below are the books and links. Have a happy and safe 4th of July holiday!

Hamilton at War 
Free today at Amazon

As the story opens, young Alexander Hamilton marches with the Continentals at Fort Lee, New Jersey. He is frustrated by being relegated to the end of the line and missing out on the action. He desperately wants to make a name for himself. His fortunes soon change at the Raritan River when the vanguard of British infantry catches up to Washington's army.

Hamilton, and his cannons are the only defense line available to prevent the army from being destroyed. Successfully protecting the Continental army and allowing their escape with his rear-guard action, Hamilton catches the attention of George Washington.

The future President asks the twenty-year-old Hamilton to join his staff. Sent on one daring mission after another Hamilton s stature grows, creating great political mistrust among his rivals. When ambition overtakes Hamilton, he threatens to overthrow Congress, which he sees as corrupt. Challenging a Congressman to a duel who views Hamilton as treasonous immigrant his world nearly self-destructs.


With the end of the American Revolution looming and his visions of his own glory fading, Hamilton becomes determined to leave Washington s staff and return to the battlefield. Washington, the only man who can help him, does all in his power to deny him. One daring assignment remains, however, that will determine the outcome of the final battle and the entire war. It is at a place called Yorktown.

Washington's Crossing: America's First D-Day
Free today at Amazon

Late December 1776.

A ragged Continental army has now put an icy river between themselves and the pursing British army. The men in blue and buff uniforms have known nothing but defeat and had once again made a narrow escape while the Congress at Philadelphia reflecting no confidence in their troops prepare to evacuate to Baltimore.

Washington’s besieged men reflect the state of a nation weary of war and a cause on the brink of extinction. They are an army in waiting - waiting for ammunition, blankets and reinforcements. But others, nearly half, are simply waiting for their enlistments to be up on January 1, 1777. Within days Washington would have no men with which to fight and the cause and the dream of independence would be over.

This is the backdrop of one of the most daring surprise attacks in American history - Washington's crossing of the Delaware and the subsequent victory at Trenton. Told in an urgent narrative style, Washington's Crossing: America's First D-Day, reveals the cast of characters and many untold aspects of the Crossing that made the victory even that much more incredible.

Gettysburg Voices from the Front
On sale today at Amazon

A stirring collection of first-hand accounts from Privates on up to the commanding Generals at the Battle of Gettysburg woven into a dramatic and compelling narrative. The reader is transported back to the chaos and uncertainty of the sweltering first three days of July 1863 when Lee's Army of Northern Virginia invaded the North threatening Philadelphia, Baltimore and Washington itself. Soldiers on both sides gave everything they had believing that Gettysburg would be the final epic battle in an already long and terrible war.






Today Marks the 100th Anniversary of the Battle of the Somme

"100 years ago today a flower of a generation marched to it's doom in a capture of less than five miles of bloody ground." From, How Canada Won the Great War. Available worldwide on Audiobook (itunes, audible) Paperback and ebook at Amazon, Barnes and Noble and other retailers.


The Battle of the Somme (French: Bataille de la Somme, German: Schlacht an der Somme), also known as the Somme Offensive, was a battle of the First World War fought by the armies of the British and French empires against the German Empire. It took place between 1 July and 18 November 1916 on both sides of upper reaches of the River Somme in France. It was the largest battle of the First World War on the Western Front; more than one million men were wounded or killed, making it one of the bloodiest battles in human history.

Available in paperback, Kindle and Nook
The French and British had committed themselves to an offensive on the Somme during Allied discussions at Chantilly, Oise, in December 1915. The Allies agreed upon a strategy of combined offensives against the Central Powers in 1916, by the French, Russian, British and Italian armies, with the Somme offensive as the Franco-British contribution. Initial plans called for the French army to undertake the main part of the Somme offensive, supported on the northern flank by the Fourth Army of the British Expeditionary Force (BEF). When the Imperial German Army began the Battle of Verdun on the Meuse on 21 February 1916, French commanders diverted many of the divisions intended for the Somme and the "supporting" attack by the British became the principal effort.

The battle is notable for the importance of air power and the first use of the tank. At the end of the battle, British and French forces had penetrated 6 miles (9.7 km) into German-occupied territory, taking more ground than in any of their offensives since the Battle of the Marne in 1914. The Anglo-French armies failed to capture PĂ©ronne and halted 3 miles (4.8 km) from Bapaume, where the German armies maintained their positions over the winter. British attacks in the Ancre valley resumed in January 1917 and forced the Germans into local withdrawals to reserve lines in February, before the scheduled retirement to the Siegfriedstellung (Hindenburg Line) began in March. Debate continues over the necessity, significance and effect of the battle. (Source wikipedia)


Friday
Posted by Robert Child

The Lost Eleven

The Lost Eleven
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