Watch My Films Streaming on Amazon Prime Video

Watch My Films Streaming on Amazon Prime Video
Click to Check Out These Films and More from the American Revolution through WWII.

Archive for November 2017

Free Gettysburg Book on Amazon Kindle

In honor of Veterans Day Weekend 2017 and my Great Grandfather, Thomas W. Child, who fought on Little Round Top with the 18th Massachusetts on the third day of battle, (See story) I am offering the Kindle version of my book Gettysburg Voices From the Front at the very low price of free. It is a stirring collection of first person narratives from the great battle.

The is also a paperback version and audiobook version but they are not part of this special promotion. If you're a Kindle user I hope you will garb a copy of this book while the promotion lasts!

Gettysburg Voices From the Front
(grab the book here)

A stirring collection of first-hand accounts from Privates on up to the commanding Generals at the Battle of Gettysburg woven into a dramatic and compelling narrative. The reader is transported back to the chaos and uncertainty of the sweltering first three days of July 1863 when Lee's Army of Northern Virginia invaded the North threatening Philadelphia, Baltimore and Washington itself. Soldiers on both sides gave everything they had believing that Gettysburg would be the final epic battle in an already long and terrible war.

Below is an interview from the Gettysburg 150th Event in the summer of 2013 when I was interviewed by Steve Bannon on the hallowed grounds of Pickett's Charge.


House Passes Bill Honoring Wereth Eleven

This is a monumental day in honoring the service of the Wereth Eleven also known as The Lost Eleven.

I received an email this morning from the Policy Advisor to Representative David McKinley of West Virginia's 1st District with great news. Resolution 43 "Honoring the Service of The Wereth Eleven" has now passed the United States House of Representatives. A parallel bill has already passed the Senate.The next step is to reconcile the two bills and get it signed into law.

Among the greatest "unknown stories" from WWII is that of the Wereth 11. Shortly after the outbreak of Hitler's Ardennes Offensive or Battle of The Bulge in 1944, members of the all-black 333rd Artillery Battalion were just eleven miles behind the front lines. With the rapid advance of the Germans the 333rd was ordered to withdraw further west but C and Service Battery were ordered to stay behind to give covering fire to the 106th Infantry Division. 

On Dec 17th the 333rd were overrun with most killed or captured. The remnants of the unit were ordered to Bastogne and incorporated into its sister unit the 969th Field Artillery Battalion. Both units provided fire support for the 101st Airborne Division in the Siege of Bastogne, subsequently being awarded the Presidential Unit Citation.

11 soldiers, however, from the 333rd were separated from the unit shortly after they were overrun by the Germans. These men wound up in the little Belgian hamlet of Wereth, just 25 kilometers southwest of Malmedy, Belgium, site of another much more well known WWII atrocity.

At about 3 pm on Dec 16, 1944, the 11 men approached the first house in the nine-house hamlet of Wereth, owned by Mathius Langer. A friend of the Langer's was also present. The men were cold, hungry, and exhausted after walking cross-country through the deep snow. They had two rifles between them. The Langer family welcomed them and gave them food. But this small part of Belgium did not necessarily welcome Americans as “Liberators.” This area had been part of Germany before the First World War and many of its citizens still saw themselves as Germans and not Belgians. 

Word leaked out from a Nazi sympathizer in the area that the men had been sheltered and were hiding in the Langer home. When the SS troops approached the house about 4 pm that day, the eleven Americans surrendered quickly, without resistance. The Americans were made to sit on the road, in the cold, until dark. The Germans then marched them down the road and gunfire was heard in the night. In the morning, villagers saw the bodies of the men in a ditch at the corner of a cow pasture. Because they were afraid that the Germans might return, they did not touch the dead soldiers. The snow covered the bodies and they remained entombed in the snow until January when villagers directed members of the 99th Div. I&R platoon to the site. 

In the official US Army report it was revealed that the men had been brutalized, with broken legs, bayonet wounds to the head, and fingers cut off. And It was apparent that one man was killed as he tried to bandage a comrade's wounds.

In 2001, three Belgium citizens embarked on the task of creating a fitting memorial to these men and additionally to honor all Black GI’s of World War II. With the help of Norman Lichtenfeld, whose father fought and was captured in the Battle of the Bulge, a grassroots publicity and fund-raising endeavor was begun. The land was purchased and a fitting memorial was created There are now road signs indicating the location of the memorial, and the Belgium Tourist Bureau lists it in the 60th Anniversary “Battle of the Bulge” brochures. The dedication of the memorial was held in 2004 in an impressive military ceremony. 
Posted by Robert Child

Monthly Drawing

Monthly Drawing
Click the image above to enter the drawing for an autographed copy.

Pipeline Newsletter



Featured Audiobook

Featured Audiobook
Click image above. Rated 4.5 Stars on Audible.com

Featured Audiobook

Featured Audiobook
Click image above to listen to a sample.

Tribute to Joe Small

Tribute to Joe Small
Joe Small Exec. Prod. - Wereth Eleven
Powered by Blogger.

Blog Archive

- Copyright © ROBERT CHILD -Metrominimalist- Powered by Blogger - Designed by Johanes Djogan -