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Posted by : Robert Child Tuesday


Serving for Justice: The Story of the 333rd Field Artillery Battalion 

Our latest WWII film has only been in release a week and has received over 15, 5 Star Reviews on Prime Video.


The Story:

Amidst the horrors and indignities of Jim Crow America, one million African Americans served their country to protect democracy abroad and expand it at home during World War II. This documentary tells of a combat unit struggling to succeed in battle, proving their full-citizenship when their lives seemed to matter less. Here is a story of fortitude, brotherhood, and faith in America's ideals.

Serving for Justice: The Story of the 333rd Field Artillery Battalion was produced by Ebony Doughboys, and written and directed by Robert Child.

"Serving for Justice is about the history of the 333rd Field Artillery Battalion. It covers a wide swath of black history from the early Jim Crow laws and how the African American experience unfolded in America and how it shaped the men who would go on to fight in World War II," said Director Robert Child.
"Originally produced for the American Embassy in Belgium, this project has grown from that original mission. To say it is timely would be quite an understatement but it goes to show that racial inequality has been with us a long while and has not been addressed properly. Perhaps now more voices are speaking up and positive change will come about. Time will tell. I am pleased, however that the work I have done in this area has continued to be noticed."

The film was produced by Ebony Doughboys, a group of African American living historians who are focused on telling the story of the outstanding record of service of African Americans during the First World War. Founded in 2014, the group is the offshoot of other African American re-enactors who for many years educated and enlightened the public on the involvement of African Americans in World War I. Today, the group forms an overarching structure for African American reenactors who hail from the east coast, the mid-west and the southern United States.

Ebony Doughboys statement:

"As a basis of our historical interpretation, we engage in the extensive research of the role of African Americans during this period by studying and reading personal accounts, archived sources, photographs and other source material. We examine photographs and original garments, accoutrements and weapons to gain a thorough understanding of the original Ebony Doughboys. We strive to reach a consistent, high level of authenticity in our appearance, realizing that as our knowledge grows, our standards for authenticity will also evolve. Members are expected to present themselves to the public with military deportment, an open-mindedness for learning, and a commitment to educating, dispelling myths, and building bridges of understanding."

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